KS3 Reporting and Assessment

At the end of primary school, pupils sit national assessments. To reach the expected standard in all areas of reading, writing and maths, a pupil must achieve a scaled score of 100 or more in reading and maths tests and an outcome of ‘working at the expected standard’ or ‘working at greater depth’ in writing Teacher Assessment. To reach the higher standard, a pupil must achieve a scaled score of 110 or more in reading and maths tests and an outcome of ‘working at greater depth’ in writing Teacher Assessment. (Department For Education, September 2018). This data is passed on to us and we use it to create academic targets for each student.

We use a combination of these scores and the CATS results to help us identify the most likely “flight path” for your daughter. We also use predictions from the Fischer Family Trust and national GCSE data to forecast students’ future grades.

Each half term you receive an Attitude to Learning report. Attitude to learning is an indicator of the level of your daughter’s commitment to learning. It includes their focus and contributions in lessons, their willingness to respond to feedback about their learning, and the effort evident in their classwork and homework. The grades are: Above and Beyond, Expected, Inconsistent and Poor.

At the end of every term you will also receive a progress report which will indicate if your daughter has made: Above Expected Progress, Expected Progress or Below Expected Progress in relation to her flight path (please see diagram below). At the end of Year 7 and 8 you will also receive an examination % for each subject assessment and the class average so that you can compare her progress to that of her peers.

FAQ

Can my daughter achieve higher levels than her target flight path indicates?

Yes! If she consistently exceeds progress expectations, her target can be raised to keep her motivated and challenged.

My daughter has a flight path leading to 3-4, does this mean low expectations?

Definitely not! Progress takes time and some students develop higher academic skills as they enter puberty. Their targets are based on their KS2 scores and CATS. At Holy Cross our students consistently achieve higher than national data so we will challenge and encourage her to aspire as high as she can.

Should I be concerned if my daughter does well in one report but not so well in the next one?

Not always. Sometimes a student will perform less well in one assessment than another. Please contact her teacher to find out why there was a dip. If there is a pattern of Below Expected Progress in a number of subjects, please contact your daughter’s tutor to arrange for intervention.

Why do we have Attitude to Learning reports as well as progress reports?

Attitude to learning is an indicator of the level of your daughter’s commitment to learning. It includes their focus and contributions in lessons, their willingness to respond to feedback about their learning, and the effort evident in their classwork and homework.

What happens if her progress is good but her Attitude to Learning is not “Expected”?

If a student receives 3 or more “Inconsistent” on her report then she will automatically go on Tutor Report and her Attitude to Learning will be reviewed at the next report point. If her ATL does not improve she will then be escalated to Director of Year intervention.

What can I do as a parent to support?

Parental support has a strong influence. We recommend that you sit down with your daughter and look at her books with her. Ask her to explain what she has learnt in her assessments and what she finds difficult. Try to create a quiet place where she can study, and make sure she gets down to work as soon as possible when she comes home in the afternoons. Check her homework planner regularly to see if she is doing her homework. Make sure she revises the work done in class – it is important to read again or make study notes on what she has learnt in order to consolidate it in her memory. Make it a game – do quizzes with her! If you have any concerns at all, either contact her tutor if it is a general worry or the relevant Head of Department or subject teacher if it is more specific.